Session
Schedule FOSDEM 2020
Community devroom

Applying Open Culture Practices across Distributed Teams

UB5.230
Katrina Novakovic
Distributed teams are where people you work with aren’t physically co-located, ie. they’re at another office building, home or an outsourced company abroad. They’re becoming increasingly popular, for DevOps and other teams, due to recruitment, diversity, flexibility and cost savings. Challenges arise due to timezones, language barriers, cultures and ways of working. People actively participating in Open Source communities tend to be effective in distributed teams. This session looks at how to apply core Open Source principles to distributed teams in Enterprise organisations, and the importance of shared purposes/goals, (mis)communication, leading vs managing teams, sharing and learning. We'll also look at practical aspects of what's worked well for others, such as alternatives to daily standups, promoting video conferencing, time management and virtual coffee breaks. This session is relevant for those leading or working in distributed teams, wanting to know how to cultivate an inclusive culture of increased trust and collaboration that leads to increased productivity and performance. All are welcome to attend.

Additional information

Type devroom

More sessions

2/2/20
Community devroom
UB5.230
Welcoming remarks and housekeeping items from your Community DevRoom 2020 Co-Chairs, Laura Czajkowski, Leslie Hawthorn, and Shirley Bailes
2/2/20
Community devroom
Jacob Green
UB5.230
Open Source is vital in the expansion wave of smart cities. Yet, where is the sustainable municipal open innovation economic engine/s, and how do we start them spinning at scale? — Only through structured collaboration and community. We present the community collaboration efforts, accomplishments, and vision of the partners behind the launch of the Johns Hopkins Open Source Program Office for Open Cities, the community creation efforts of the City of Paris's open source city services platform ...
2/2/20
Community devroom
Matthew Broberg
UB5.230
There is some combination of a turf war and a diaspora happening in the open source communities I participate in. There are synchronous and async channels galore. Every one of them has fans and haters with firmly held opinions on how it's the best or worst thing in the world. Let's take a step back and take a look at the landscape together. What are our communities searching for when they hop into communication channels? How do we meet new members where they are comfortable in order to be more ...
2/2/20
Community devroom
Don Goodman-Wilson
UB5.230
Open Source was supposed to level the playing field for creating and consuming software by reducing the monopolistic power of companies building proprietary software. But we didn't get the kind of democratized gift economy we were expecting. Instead, we are seeing open source creating opportunities and incentives for the already privileged to create new, and exacerbate existing, injustices. To the extent that we want to use software to create a just world, we should reject the Open Source ...
2/2/20
Community devroom
UB5.230
OpenForum Europe's mission is to connect communities, organisations and developers with policymakers. In this talk we will discuss what we've learned during our campaign against the Copyright Directive and present an important opportunity to engage with European policymaking today: providing input to the European Commission’s study on the impact of Open Source Software and Hardware.
2/2/20
Community devroom
Deb Nicholson
UB5.230
The software that is the easiest to build -- the software that is the easiest to fund the development of -- tends to serve those who are already extremely well-served. So, how do we bridge the gap between what society needs and what many people with money want to fund? Free and open source software platforms can get us part of the way there, but without some big changes, it won't be enough. Let's talk structure!
2/2/20
Community devroom
Allon Mureinik
UB5.230
Open source thrives on diversity. The last couple of years has seen huge strides in that aspect with codes of conduct and initiatives like the Contributor Covenant. While these advancements are crucial, they are not enough. In order to truly be inclusive, it’s not enough for the community members to be welcoming and unbiased, the communities’ processes and procedures really support inclusiveness by not only making marginalized members welcome, but allowing them to fully participate.