Session
Schedule FOSDEM 2022
Open Source Design

We hear you!

Collecting and processing user feedback, for real!
D.design
Clara Garcia
<p>A lot of UX practitioners don't talk to users on a regular basis, at Penpot we might be on the opposite side of the spectrum. We gather a lot of feedback from our users. What for? Fixing (bugs), improving (enhancements), discovering (new needs), prioritizing (asking/frequent queries as an indicator). And the most important thing is what do we do with that feedback and which kind of feedback would we like to receive?</p>
At Penpot, we work as a full support team. We think of our users as a knowledgeable open space they provide us and we all work to learn from the market. Also it’s important to mention that we design Penpot with Penpot, the team members are users too. Plus we manage all our work at Penpot with our sibling Taiga, a powerful agile project management tool which is our sibling company. Obviously we have our own product development vision, but we like to discover what our users think with an open- feedback policy, and feel validation with conducted tests. Our community is the most important and fundamental part in Penpot’s roadmap.

Additional information

Type devroom

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