Session
Schedule FOSDEM 2020
Freedom

Open Source Under Attack

How we, the OSI and others can defend it
Whether it is "Open Core", the Mongo SSPL or the Common Clause, the core ethos of open source has been under attack for some time. As those parties who seek to limit the promise of free software enjoys more and more success, the community will need stronger and more forceful tools to defend ourselves. Presenters: Michael Cheng (Facebook), Max Sills (Google), Chris Aniszczyk (Linux Foundation)

Additional information

Type maintrack

More sessions

2/1/20
Freedom
UD2.Corridor
Amanda is the chair of the United Nations Technology and Innovation Labs' Open source and IP Advisory Board and will give an overview of the work being done by the labs and take the audience through a couple of case studies using data and blockchain for good in an open way.
2/2/20
Freedom
Krzysztof Daniel
Janson
"Open Source" has been wildly successful, no doubt. Yet, in recent years, we have seen a massive amount of failed 'open' projects. Why is that? I have identified 10 scenarios in which the 'Open' approach works. But what is most interesting, is that those scenarios have enabling conditions, and while those conditions are taken for granted, they are not. Not every 'Open' project is sustainable. Not every project is worth adopting or contributing to. During the presentation, we will look into what ...
2/2/20
Freedom
Matthias Kirschner
Janson
If you are a Free Software (Open Source Software) developer, do you have to follow an open development model or a certain business model? Do you have to believe in or be a supporter of socialism, capitalism, or liberalism? Do we, when we work for software freedom, have to agree on certain positions on privacy, intelligence services, the military, the climate catastrophe, nuclear power, vaccinations, or animal rights? Or should we accept to have different views or even allow each other not to ...
2/2/20
Freedom
Thierry Carrez
Janson
A lot of open source developers choose to deploy their software on infrastructure based on proprietary software. Behind this apparent paradox is the need to adapt to changing environments, adopt new technologies fast, and use increasing amounts of computing power. Open infrastructure (computing, networking and storage infrastructure based on open source software) has a lot to offer, but it's easy to overlook if you don't take the time to take a step back and analyze the situation rationally. In ...
2/2/20
Freedom
Frank Karlitschek
Janson
In the past few years we saw a lot of discussions around free software licenses and why they are bad for companies. This talk debunks this claim and shows how free software licenses are actually great for startups if done right.
2/2/20
Freedom
Janson
Karen and Bradley, building on the substantial feedback from last year's keynote, follow up their 2019 FOSDEM keynote with real-world suggestions, ideas, and discussion about how we, as software freedom activists, can live in a world with so much proprietary software. Software freedom is hard to find, but we can find it together, and we can support each other when we must face the proprietary software world and make hard decisions. Let's figure it out together and support each other!
2/2/20
Freedom
Janson
Linux mobile software and GNU/Linux distributions are currently not widely available for smartphones. This talk covers why it is desirable to have GNU/Linux (not: Android or Android-based) on your smartphone, what the current state of various software attempts at Linux on smartphones is, what progress has been made, and will also dive into the available old and new hardware (including the PinePhone and Librem 5) to run the software & distributions on.