Session
Schedule FOSDEM 2020
Open Source Design

Design contributions to OSS: Learnings from the Open Design project at Ushahidi

Structuring in-person and remote workshops for open source design contributions.
H.2213
Eriol Fox
Ushahidi builds OSS humanitarian tools, remotely for some of the most marginalized people across the globe. To tackle these systemic problems with how to ‘open source’ a design effort and bring the community along with the ‘on-staff’ Ushahidi designers, we’ve been piloting a series of design events on our OSS crisis communication tool TenFour with our partners Designit and Adobe. Together, we’re looking to solve the problems with how open source design can work by engaging through meaningful technology that makes a difference in the world. We’re here to take you through that journey and what we’ve learnt about design contributions to OSS.

In this session, we'll briefly cover the history of the project and the main problems we attempted to solve and we'll present the learning and adaptions to our workshop framework and methodology that aims to engage design teams and individuals that are not yet 'on-board' with OSS as an ethos or movement.

Looking into some the abstract deeper motivations for design professionals to contribute but also some practical tips on structuring issues, labelling and maintaining design (and extended functions like research, UX and product management) you'll leave with a set of tools and methods you can apply to your OSS to engage with designers.

Additional information

Type devroom

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