Session
FOSDEM Schedule 2021
Retrocomputing

Gemini, a modern protocol that looks retro

Back to the 1990s with a protocol and format to distribute real content, without tracking and visual effects
D.retro
Stéphane Bortzmeyer
Many people are unhappy with the current state of the Web: pervasive user tracking, a lot of distractions from the actual content, so complicated that it is very hard to develop from scratch a new browser. Why not going back to the future, with a protocol and format focused on lightweight distribution of content? This is Gemini, both a new ultra-simple protocol and a simple format. Not to develop an alternative to YouTube but useful to access content with a minimal client. Gemini is not "retro" but it "looks retro".

Additional information

Type devroom

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