Session
FOSDEM 2021 Schedule
Go

The State of Go

What's new since Go 1.15
Go 1.16 is planned to be released in February 2021 and this talk covers what's coming up with it. We'll talk about new features and fixes in Go, new proposals for Go 2. All of the new things you might have missed.
This has been a staple talk of the Go devroom, opening the stage every year, and has always been a successful one.

Additional information

Type devroom

More sessions

2/6/21
Go
Nicolas Lepage
D.go
Have you ever thought to yourself "It would be nice to run this Go HTTP server directly in a browser for demonstration" ? No? Well I have! But it's not possible, right? A Go WebAssembly binary can run in browsers, but cannot serve HTTP... Or could it? Could we run a Go WebAssembly binary into a browser's ServiceWorker, and serve HTTP from it? Well let's find out!
2/6/21
Go
Ron Evans
D.go
Go programmers now have access to an entire world of Bluetooth devices, the most popular Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN) standard ever created, all using our favorite programming language, thanks to the aptly named "Go Bluetooth" (https://tinygo.org/bluetooth). Developers can write code to control Bluetooth Low Energy devices from standard Go programs running on desktop operating systems. In addition, developers can create Bluetooth Low Energy peripheral devices running bare-metal on chips ...
2/6/21
Go
Sean DuBois
D.go
In 2020 we saw a huge spike in interest for RTC. Developers worked quickly to build new tools with the challenge of a socially distanced world. Go has really started to make strides in the RTC world with Pion. Easy deploy, great performance, memory safety and ability to prototype helped it take on C/C++. This talk shows you some basics on WebRTC, then how to use Pion and what you can build with it
2/6/21
Go
Miki Tebeka
D.go
In this talk we'll see how we can call Python function from Go "in memory" and with close to none serialization.
2/6/21
Go
Kris Nova
D.go
replaces the CANCELLED Go-ing Secure
2/6/21
Go
Andrew Williams
D.go
With the growing popularity of Go many people are asking how to build a solid GUI. The language design to target concurrency and portability makes it a great match for cross-platform development. This talk shows how the Fyne toolkit is designed to help make beautiful and idiomatic native apps with Go.
2/6/21
Go
Brad Fitzpatrick
D.go
I worked on the Go team at Google for about 10 years working on bits of everything, but primarily the standard library (net/http, etc) & its build system. In that time I wrote lots of Go, but almost primarily for Go itself. Joining a startup, I now finally get to use Go all day to build a real product (Tailscale) and it's super exciting. We use Go on the server and in 5 clients: Linux, Windows, macOS, iOS, Android.